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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Until now, every vehicle I've driven in my adult life has been without TPMS sensors, and I prefer it that way. Having an automotive fabrication background, I can understand the dilemma these engineers face with the NV200. They don't know if you're using your van at max. payload, unloaded, or somewhere in between. So, for liability reasons, they'll set the TPM sensor parameters as if you're hauling at, or near max. payload. I haul a 230# dirtbike and 70# of gear, so I'm going to wear out the centers of any tire I run on the rear if keeping the required pressure they've set. The factory tires are junk, I knew that from day 1. That's usually how OEM tires are and whatever. However, once I put a nice set of tires on, I want to run whatever pressure I want. Having that said, I am NOT claiming that I will perform this modification and I'm certainly am NOT TELLING ANYONE ELSE to do so either. This is simply info that you can use if you so choose. :)
The NV does not have a smart enough system to know where each sensor is located (for example, some vehicles will tell you actual location of the tire that is low on pressure). Without getting too specific, one could take the spare tire, remove the tire from the wheel, and drill the needed holes to install all 4 sensors in the wheel. Re-mount the tire and inflate between the 44 and 48 PSI. Now, is your average tire shop gonna re-mount that tire on your newly modded wheel with multiple TPMS valve stems? Probably not, just sayin'...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The concept is that all 4 would send the needed signal, just not from their original location on the vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I just realized that I didn't directly answer your question, so yes, all 4 in the spare. Of course, this requires having to run a standard valve stem in the wheels you choose to run on the ground. Your tire shop may or may not approve, so just throwing that out there. I personally have the least amount of other people work on my vehicles, so I typically take my wheels tires in "off" the vehicles anyway for service, do my own rotation, maintenance, etc... so a tire shop will probably never see my actual vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeah, not only the light, but the scrolling "check tire pressure" text that keeps the digital display data from appearing.
 

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What if you just removed all the tire sensors and threw them inside the spare tire - without drilling all those holes? Wouldnt that work just as well?
 

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Hmmm might work I suppose but OTOH that the outside of the sensor is exposed to the same overinflation maybe will alter its sensing/reporting? Also what is the spare normally inflated to?

Maybe someone makes a "header" you could mount all the TPMS into and over-inflate to make the computer happy. But I think it's illegal for a tire shop to remove and replace TPMS sensors with non-TPMS valves.
 

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I found out the spinning of the wheel activates the sensors... so they have to be mounted in a spinning wheel.
I talked to a "Nissan Mechanic" online on the "Just Ask" website the other day. He insisted that the sensors only measure a difference between all four wheels and not a specific pressure. So if all tires are at 35lbs then the computer wont kick out an error. He said that just so that the tire pressure doesnt go below 27lbs it will satisfy the computer.
I ran this by my tire guy who I've been buying tires from for 30 years and he says he really doesn't believe him. So I'm going to talk to a service manager monday morning and see exactly what's going on.
I'm up to buying a larger rim with a higher pressure passenger tire if that what it takes. If not, I'll be going through 3 sets of tires a year.
 

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IMO, TPMS systems are overly complicated and add zero benefits.
Folks who are too lazy to check their tires and tire pressure on a regular basis are also going to ignore any warning lites on the dash.

In countries where winter tire/wheel switchover is common the TPMS system adds unnecessary cost and expense.
In Canada it is common to put black tape over the TPMS warning lite on the dash, but as was mentioned, some vehicles have addtional warnings which cannot be taped over.

The drilling of the spare tire and installing all 4 TPMS sensors in the spare will not work on all vehicles. Some guys have also used a steel pressure vessel stored in the vehicle with the TPMS sensors in it.

On my Canadian/ North American Chevy City Express/NV200 it does look like I can simply tape over the TPMS sensor warning lite.
There are no audio beeping and no other messages on the LCD display.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
UPDATE! I didn't realize it had been so long since I posted this. Anyway, my experience with TPMS until now has been with domestic vehilces, and I assumed Nissan had a similar setup, but unfortunately they're not.


For example, in the past I've put sensors in spare tires and also built simple pressurized canisters to bypass the system with success, but these Nissan vehicles not only monitor pressure, but also rotation.


So, there are 2 issues. 1. low pressure indicator light and 2. the scrolling "check tire pressure" text. Each one creates a problem to overcome. The indicator light will earn you a fail on your safety inspection. The scrolling text is an inconvenience designed to encourage compliance, as the text will hide ODO, trip, MPG, and temp. display until fixed.


Recently, I finally threw on some new wheels and tires (without sensors) and tested my theory by simply placing the stock wheels/tires in the van and taking a drive. If this kept the TPMS system happy, then I'd use my spare or build a pressurized canister and be done like the good 'ol days.


Does this work? Yes, but only partially. Having the sensors under pressure (whether in tires on the ground, in tires riding in the van, or inside a pressurized container of some kind) will de-activate the scrolling text, which is the most annoying part. However, the indicator light will remain, because the system Nissan uses apparently requires the sensors to be in motion.


For the time being I'm happy, because I can control the scrolling text and use all the display functions, but will have to live with the indicator light.


In the meantime, I'm gonna dissect a sensor and see if it can be modified to solve the other issue.
 

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I learned about these issues when one of my tires picked-up a screw developing a slow leak.

Believing therefore that TPMS have merit I instead await more OEM-size tire options for this vehicle, or more preferably some sort of size upgrade e.g. to 16-inchers that includes TPMS that work with the onboard display.

Others may feel free to carry pipe bombs in their vehicles! :rolleyes:;)
 

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So if I get winter tires, with aftermarket 15 inch wheels, no TPMS sensors is the worst thing to happen that the lights will be on and scrolling message.

Then once I put the original wheels and tires back on, will the light and scrolling message go out again on their own?
 

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So if I get winter tires, with aftermarket 15 inch wheels, no TPMS sensors is the worst thing to happen that the lights will be on and scrolling message.

Then once I put the original wheels and tires back on, will the light and scrolling message go out again on their own?




Due to all my tire issues, my stupid TPMS lite has been on more than off in my 6 months in this van.. :rolleyes:
I now have a piece of black electrical tape over the TPMS lite.
This is common in Canada since so many switch over to winter/wheels tires and the TPMS system is useless and not worth the cost.


However on my Canadian Chevy City Express, I do not a scrolling message on the LCD dash readout. I just get the TPMS lite on.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So if I get winter tires, with aftermarket 15 inch wheels, no TPMS sensors is the worst thing to happen that the lights will be on and scrolling message.

Then once I put the original wheels and tires back on, will the light and scrolling message go out again on their own?

Yep.
 

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When making the "dummy" TPMS sensor filled canister, did you have to purchase Nissan OEM TPMS sensors for your experiment to work?
 

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I own a Toyota Prius and at the time of purchase I negotiated four winter tires on rims + TPMS sensors to avoid driving five months of the year with a low tire pressure caution light in the instrument cluster. I quickly found out that the Prius "tire" computer can only handle the four TPMS sensors that are coded inside the computer. Although, I do my summer to winter tire change myself, I still have to go to the dealer to get them coded into the car's "brain" or "computer" because I have two sets of four sensors.
 
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